Patriotic: Standing for All Valiant Filipino Veterans

A #FilipinoAmerican Story as told by Filipino American World War II Veteran, Aniceto Ilanga Bagley. Read his full story below:"When I was two years old, my adoptive American parents took me to live in San Francisco. When I was 5, we returned to the Philippines, and I grew up in an American household in the city of Bacolod, in Negros Island. Outside our American home, Filipinos had also embraced the democratic and freedom-loving ways of the United States. The American government flooded the country with its teachers, engineers, medical personnel, government specialists, businessmen, and other professionals. At school on Monday mornings and at every public gathering, the American and Philippines flags were both raised. English was the official language, and it remains widely used today.I was getting ready to graduate from high school when World War II broke out. As the Japanese invasion became imminent, we evacuated to my birth parents’ hometown on Panay Island. My grandfather was one of the patriarchs of the town, and my family felt that my foster parents would be safer there under the protection of our clan. I joined a guerrilla unit on the island of Panay, under the command of Macario Peralta, a Philippine Army officer who had refused to surrender. We had the components of a regular army organization at that time: infantry, field artillery, ordnance, transportation, signal, quartermaster, and medics. We had radio contact with the allied general headquarters in Australia and were one of the first recognized guerrilla organizations. We might have looked different, but in our hearts, we thought of ourselves both as Filipinos and as Americans. We endured the occupation of our homeland and remained loyal to the United States throughout those terrible years. Filipinos fought and died side-by-side with American soldiers on Bataan and Corregidor. The Philippines may be independent now, but please remember the sacrifice that we made for freedom—yours and ours—during the years of World War II."About: Filipino American Disruptors is a month-long storytelling initiative powered by NextDayBetter x AARP AAPI Community celebrating the stories of Filipino Americans in a range of disciplines from community activism to tech entrepreneurship. These forward-thinking individuals are trendsetters, trailblazers, and problem-solvers in their respective fields, helping to push America and the Filipino American community forward through their leadership, creativity, and innovation.NextDayBetter Storyteller: Bryan Ramos

Posted by AARP AAPI Community on Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Patriotic: Standing for All Valiant Filipino Veterans

A #FilipinoAmerican Story as told by Filipino American World War II Veteran, Aniceto Ilanga Bagley.

“When I was two years old, my adoptive American parents took me to live in San Francisco. When I was 5, we returned to the Philippines, and I grew up in an American household in the city of Bacolod, in Negros Island. Outside our American home, Filipinos had also embraced the democratic and freedom-loving ways of the United States. The American government flooded the country with its teachers, engineers, medical personnel, government specialists, businessmen, and other professionals. At school on Monday mornings and at every public gathering, the American and Philippines flags were both raised. English was the official language, and it remains widely used today.

I was getting ready to graduate from high school when World War II broke out. As the Japanese invasion became imminent, we evacuated to my birth parents’ hometown on Panay Island. My grandfather was one of the patriarchs of the town, and my family felt that my foster parents would be safer there under the protection of our clan.

I joined a guerrilla unit on the island of Panay, under the command of Macario Peralta, a Philippine Army officer who had refused to surrender. We had the components of a regular army organization at that time: infantry, field artillery, ordnance, transportation, signal, quartermaster, and medics. We had radio contact with the allied general headquarters in Australia and were one of the first recognized guerrilla organizations.

We might have looked different, but in our hearts, we thought of ourselves both as Filipinos and as Americans. We endured the occupation of our homeland and remained loyal to the United States throughout those terrible years. Filipinos fought and died side-by-side with American soldiers on Bataan and Corregidor. The Philippines may be independent now, but please remember the sacrifice that we made for freedom—yours and ours—during the years of World War II.”

About:
Filipino American Disruptors is a month-long storytelling initiative powered by NextDayBetter x AARP AAPI Communityommunity celebrating the stories of Filipino Americans in a range of disciplines from community activism to tech entrepreneurship. These forward-thinking individuals are trendsetters, trailblazers, and problem-solvers in their respective fields, helping to push America and the Filipino American community forward through their leadership, creativity, and innovation.

NextDayBetter Storyteller: Candice Quimpo