Connector: Creating Intersectional and Inclusive Spaces for Ch...

A #FilipinoAmerican story as told by coalition builder and organizer, Gregory Cendana. Read his full story below:"We live in difficult times. It feels like our communities are under attack after attack after attack. Now, more than ever, I remember the dreams our ancestors had about us and how they built strong foundations for us to stand on. My first trip to Washington DC as a student leader opened my eyes to the importance of intersectionality and that no matter one’s identity, we were more alike than apart. I met people who were fighting for access to higher education, gender and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) justice, and to dismantle multiple forms of systematic oppression. It gave me a sense I was part of something bigger larger than myself. During my time at the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), it was an important to have those most marginalized at the forefront--ensuring folks at the table represented the rich diversity of our country. And if not, work to create new tables! Whether it’s someone dealing with HIV, or living in constant fear that they may be deported, or declaring Black Lives Matter—there is power in connecting at the personal level and leveraging our collective power. Like many, I feel vulnerable. And I feel frustrated with so many things! I feel frustrated with white supremacy, patriarchy, and capitalism; with how people of color and LGBT folks are impacted exponentially. People want our culture, our food, and for us to perform, play sports or be the help but without the dignity or respect, we deserve. But I don’t feel helpless. I choose to channel my anger into my work of uplifting, nurturing, and spending time with my people. I look at myself and those around me; at my own community and our own prejudice. I want other Filipino Americans to make more connections with other people of color: other Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinx and Black folks. Racism and discrimination affect all of us, and we need to keep everyone accountable—including our own friends and families. Through education and with love, we can build awareness and understanding. There’s work to be done. When we build genuine relationships regardless of our affiliations and come together, the more powerful we become to right the inequalities that face us." About: Filipino American Disruptors is a month-long storytelling initiative powered by NextDayBetter x AARP AAPI Community celebrating the stories of Filipino Americans in a range of disciplines from community activism to tech entrepreneurship. These forward-thinking individuals are trendsetters, trailblazers, and problem-solvers in their respective fields, helping to push America and the Filipino American community forward through their leadership, creativity, and innovation. #FAHM #FAHM2017

Posted by AARP AAPI Community on Friday, October 20, 2017

A #FilipinoAmerican story as told by coalition builder and organizer, Gregory Cendana.

“We live in difficult times. It feels like our communities are under attack after attack after attack. Now, more than ever, I remember the dreams our ancestors had about us and how they built strong foundations for us to stand on.

My first trip to Washington DC as a student leader opened my eyes to the importance of intersectionality and that no matter one’s identity, we were more alike than apart. I met people who were fighting for access to higher education, gender and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) justice, and to dismantle multiple forms of systematic oppression. It gave me a sense I was part of something bigger larger than myself.

During my time at the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), it was an important to have those most marginalized at the forefront–ensuring folks at the table represented the rich diversity of our country. And if not, work to create new tables! Whether it’s someone dealing with HIV, or living in constant fear that they may be deported, or declaring Black Lives Matter—there is power in connecting at the personal level and leveraging our collective power.
Like many, I feel vulnerable. And I feel frustrated with so many things! I feel frustrated with white supremacy, patriarchy, and capitalism; with how people of color and LGBT folks are impacted exponentially. People want our culture, our food, and for us to perform, play sports or be the help but without the dignity or respect, we deserve.

But I don’t feel helpless. I choose to channel my anger into my work of uplifting, nurturing, and spending time with my people. I look at myself and those around me; at my own community and our own prejudice. I want other Filipino Americans to make more connections with other people of color: other Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinx, and Black folks.

Racism and discrimination affect all of us, and we need to keep everyone accountable—including our own friends and families. Through education and with love, we can build awareness and understanding. There’s work to be done. When we build genuine relationships regardless of our affiliations and come together, the more powerful we become to right the inequalities that face us.”

About:
Filipino American Disruptors is a month-long storytelling initiative powered by NextDayBetter x AARP AAPI Communityommunity celebrating the stories of Filipino Americans in a range of disciplines from community activism to tech entrepreneurship. These forward-thinking individuals are trendsetters, trailblazers, and problem-solvers in their respective fields, helping to push America and the Filipino American community forward through their leadership, creativity, and innovation.

NextDayBetter Storyteller: Candice Quimpo