Selfless: Battling Alzheimer's Disease

A #DearGrandparents Story Told By Erica Naqvi (Taiwanese American)"As far as I can remember, my grandmother was always around—and she was always ready to feed us. She was a great cook and my childhood memories are filled with dishes she made for us. I don’t know how she did it. We shared a room until I was 9 and I never saw her when I’d wake up; she’d have gotten up early to cook our breakfast. After school, she’d welcome us with a snack, before she’d get dinner ready. At dinner, there’d always be some kind of feast. My grandma left Taiwan to help us around the house so my parents could work. I found out that her life before coming here had been difficult. First, her father was an opium addict who didn’t want her because she wasn’t born a boy. Then, he wanted to sell her so he could buy more opium! Luckily, a relative snuck her away. It was somewhat safer, but she was also had to learn to harvest opium to deal with their poverty. Then, her marriage was a sham because her husband was a womanizer. But I never saw her as bitter or dejected. The grandma I know overflowed with love—she received it from her children and she gave to us so completely. It’s upsetting to see Grandma these days. She had a stroke and suffers from Alzheimer’s and dementia. Sometimes, she doesn’t know us. Sometimes, she shouts at us. Sometimes, we have good days, like when she sees my children playing and it brings her so much joy. I wish my kids could know her like I do. They’ll never taste her cooking and we don’t know how to cook the way she did. But she is a part of me. I am able to love my children unconditionally because of how much she gave of herself to all of us." About The Campaign: Our #DearGrandparents storytelling series powered by NextDayBetter and AARP AAPI Community celebrates the sacrifice, resilience, and triumphs of Asian American Pacific Islanders for Grandparents Day. Share your Grandparent’s story in the comment section below and tag us. Written by NextDayBetter Storyteller: Candice Lopez-Quimpo

Posted by AARP AAPI Community on Monday, September 11, 2017

Selfless: Battling Alzheimer’s Disease

A #DearGrandparents Story Told By Erica Naqvi (Taiwanese American)

“As far as I can remember, my grandmother was always around—and she was always ready to feed us. She was a great cook and my childhood memories are filled with dishes she made for us.
I don’t know how she did it. We shared a room until I was 9 and I never saw her when I’d wake up; she’d have gotten up early to cook our breakfast. After school, she’d welcome us with a snack, before she’d get dinner ready. At dinner, there’d always be some kind of feast.

My grandma left Taiwan to help us around the house so my parents could work. I found out that her life before coming here had been difficult. First, her father was an opium addict who didn’t want her because she wasn’t born a boy. Then, he wanted to sell her so he could buy more opium! Luckily, a relative snuck her away. It was somewhat safer, but she was also had to learn to harvest opium to deal with their poverty. Then, her marriage was a sham because her husband was a womanizer. But I never saw her as bitter or dejected. The grandma I know overflowed with love—she received it from her children and she gave to us so completely.

It’s upsetting to see Grandma these days. She had a stroke and suffers from Alzheimer’s and dementia. Sometimes, she doesn’t know us. Sometimes, she shouts at us. Sometimes, we have good days, like when she sees my children playing and it brings her so much joy.

I wish my kids could know her like I do. They’ll never taste her cooking and we don’t know how to cook the way she did. But she is a part of me. I am able to love my children unconditionally because of how much she gave of herself to all of us.”
About The Campaign:
Our #DearGrandparents storytelling series powered by NextDayBetter and AARP AAPI Community celebrates the sacrifice, resilience, and triumphs of Asian American Pacific Islanders for Grandparents Day. Share your Grandparent’s story in the comment section below and tag us.

Written by NextDayBetter Storyteller: Candice Quimpo